St. Louis Circuit Atty Gardner's Case Against Governor Greitens Facing More Challenges

The criminal case against Missouri Governor Eric Greitens is facing even more challenges this week. Monday, Greitens' defense team filed more motions tied to St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner's investigation and grand jury, which led to Greitens' indictment on a felony charge of invasion of privacy.

The criminal case against Missouri Governor Eric Greitens is facing even more challenges this week. Monday, Greitens' defense team filed more motions tied to St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner's investigation and grand jury, which led to Greitens' indictment on a felony charge of invasion of privacy.

The case has been criticized for lack of evidence, or even a victim. Gardner has also faced criticism for turning down a police investigation, instead hiring private investigators to help build her case.

Greitens' defense team filed motions to dismiss the case Monday, "Based on False and Misleading Grand Jury Instructions", saying that Assistant Circuit Attorney Robert Steele made misleading statements to the grand jury.

The key point from the motion is the alleged victim, who has not come forward to file any charges, and has refused to talk publicly about her affair with Greitens, which happened before he ran for governor. Her testimony, the motion says, indicates that she never saw any camera or cell phone that would have taken a photo.

The woman's ex-husband has said that she told him when they were still married that Greitens took a photo of her in a compromising position and threatened to use it against her. The woman is heard on an audio recording making the claim, while admitting the affair to her then husband, who recorded her without her knowledge.

The motions also say that one of the private investigators hired by Gardner's office testified that he was unaware that anyone had made an effort to find evidence that an alleged photo was taken or sent on any computer. In his sworn testimony, he said that no witness involved with the indictment had even seen the alleged photo.

A hearing is set for next Monday morning, where the judge can either dismiss the case or the motions.

Greitens' defense team also filed a motion over the weekend to dismiss an attorney, Harvard Law Professor Ronald Sullivan, from Gardner's team. Gardner reportedly hired Sullivan to advise her team on the case for $12,000 per month plus travel and hotel accommodations.

Greitens' lawyers say hiring Sullivan is a criminal misdemeanor, saying that he has conflicts of interest because he worked as a criminal defense attorney and that it is illegal for the prosecution to hire a private attorney to assist in prosecuting cases.

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