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Missouri Voters Reject Law Against Mandatory Union Fees In Private Sector

The vote comes on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that public sector unions cannot require all employees pay them dues and fees, regardless if they choose to be in the union or not.

Missouri voters voted down a right-to-work law that would have made mandatory union dues illegal in the private sector. The vote was held during the state's primary election and there was a strongly-funded push to reject the law (Proposition A).

The vote comes on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that public sector unions cannot require all employees pay them dues and fees, regardless if they choose to be in the union or not.

Missouri's law against mandatory union dues in the private sector was successfully passed and signed by then Governor Eric Greitens, but the union groups successfully challenged the law in court, pushing it to a public vote. If the law had been upheld, Missouri would have become the sixth state known for historically strong unions to adopt the change since 2012.

Union groups spent more than $15 million to campaign against Proposition A, more than three times groups supporting the law spent.

The groups supporting right-to-work vowed to bring the law back, likely in the next legislative session.

Unions claim that all workers should pay their dues and fees because the law requires them to represent all employees, but right-to-work supporters say that people should have the right to choose whether or not to be a part of the union and pay its fees.

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